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Archive:Conference BoF 2010

tagline: From openSUSE

Besides presentations, we have Birds of a Feather sessions which are informal discussion meetings. A number of sessions are already scheduled but further sessions can be proposed anytime - even at the conference.

Take the chance to get your topic covered and discuss it with the right people during the conference. Just add your BoF when you want here, change time slots if necessary, add material, change BoFs with each other. During the conference we'll have white boards where we/you schedule the BoFs ad hoc. The rooms for BoFs are equipped with a beamer, a screen and a white board.


Wednesday, October 20, Workshop I, Room Sachs

Time Room Coordinator Topic Description
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break Lunch break Lunch break
13:30 - 15:00 Sachs James Tan SUSE Studio Gallery This workshop will focus on the advance software and configuration features of SUSE Studio. Attendees should have their own laptops for this session in order to use SUSE Studio (http://susestudio.com) (assuming decent wifi connectivity). Members of the friendly SUSE Studio development team will be present to help answer any queries. Long abstract
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break Coffee break Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Sachs Ladislav Slezak Using Netbeans for Ruby on Rails development In this session I'd like to show how Ruby on Rails applications can be developed in Netbeans, reveal some tricks, show the most interesting plugins... Long abstract
17:00 - 18:00 Sachs openSUSE Board openSUSE Board Foundation - what's going on ? Talk with the Board. Q&A
18:00 - 18:30 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
18:30 - 19:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:00 - 19:30 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:30 - 20:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd

Wednesday, October 20, Workshop II, Room Pavilion

Time Room Coordinator Topic Description
10:30 - 12:00 Pavilion Marcus Moeller Mentoring system This includes a small introduction how mentoring is used in other open source projects, followed by an open discussion to figure out in which areas this also might make sense for openSUSE.

The workshop is open for everyone who would like to attend.

12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break Lunch break Lunch break
13:30 - 14:15 Pavilion Lars Dieckow Abandon Subversion The best way to convert your code repository to git.
14:15 - 15:00 Pavilion Javier Llorente The openPC Case (moved from morning) Javier wants to give an overview about the Open-PC - what it is, why the've chosen openSUSE and how to make your own image. Long abstract
15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break Coffee break Coffee break
15:30 - 17:00 Pavilion Michael Hrusecky kvm, libvirt & openSUSE live Basic introduction to KVM and Qemu. How to use it, what is great about that and what is not so great. Basic introduction to the Libvirt. How to use it, why to use it and what are the benefits. openSUSE Live overview.

openSUSE Live as an example of technologies mentioned previously. Again, what is it, it's benefits and downsides.

17:00 - 17:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
17:30 - 18:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
18:00 - 18:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
18:30 - 19:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
19:00 - 19:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
19:30 - 20:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd

Thursday October 21, Room Pavilion

Time Room Coordinator Topic Short Description
10:30 - 11:15 Pavilion Stefan Werden Linux for the Consumer Market

Changes of Linux and consumer behaviour and future challenges for traditional distros. Long Abstract

11:15 - 12:00 Pavilion Kai-Uwe Behrmann OpenICC Colour Management BoF Discussion of colour management on the desktop. Long abstract
12:00 - 13:30 Lunch break Lunch break Lunch break
13:30 - 14:15 Pavilion Michael Löffler, Stephan Kulow, Andreas Jaeger openSUSE 11.4 Let's elaborate together what could/should be the three top features of openSUSE 11.4?
14:15 - 15:00 Pavilion Stefan Fent Bootloader Future

Beginning with a short presentation about actual bootloaders and their capabilities and limitations (max. 10mins), followed by a discussion about what's good/bad in openSUSE, are there any changes desirable/needed, which setups/ bootloaders do work, which ones are expected to work. And finally: How do we get there?

15:00 - 15:30 Coffee break Coffee break Coffee break
15:30 - 16:15 Pavilion Milisav Radmanic Network Management - quo vadis?

Presentation on current utilities and frameworks for managing and configuring network interfaces and connections. It is meant to provide a brief overview on current tools and libs and to manifest the challenges we have to deal with inside and between different distributions.

16:15 - 17:00 Pavilion Kay Sievers, Lennard Poettering Systemd

We will give an introduction about systemd in general, cover SUSE specific issues with the current version in Factory, but the major part should be a discussion about all that.

17:00 - 17:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
17:30 - 18:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
18:00 - 18:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
18:30 - 19:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
19:00 - 19:30 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd
19:30 - 20:00 Pavilion tbd tbd tbd

Thursday October 21, Room Sachs

Time Room Coordinator Topic Short Description
TBD
10:30 - 12:00 Sachs Bernhard Wiedemann Hands on automagic testing This is a practical addendum to the presentation "How automated testing can help improve a distribution". Depending on audience, this can show how to add own tests and/or take a closer look at the core testing code. All interactive.
13:30 - 15:00 Sachs Martin, Caj High Availability Setup of openVPN Overiew of involved Services (DRBD, Pacermaker, openVPN, ) and detailed dependencies and configuration options of those services to make the openVPN access a high availability service and the integration in an existing environment, Long abstract
15:30 - 16:15 Sachs Susanne Oberhauser Detangle "the Distro" from Driver Problems The desire to improve "the hardware situation" is the long standing #1 request of the community in all surveys. However this problem is real hard. In this talk we survey the underlying challenges and outline the competing solution approaches.
16:15 - 17:00 Sachs Duncan Mac-Vicar WebYaST, webdev and Rails
  • Improving rails stack on openSUSE
  • WebYaST as a setup tool for openSUSE appliances, build service for example
  • more centralization of documentation an resources around these topics
  • making Rails a core part of openSUSE community development toolbox
17:00 - 18:00 Sachs Bryen Yunashko, Andreas Jaeger openSUSE Marketing Discuss marketing about openSUSE and meet people involved with it. This is meant as a face to face marketing team meeting.
18:00 - 18:30 Sachs Frank Karlitschek Ovi Discuss collaboration between Ovi, openSUSE and KDE. Ovi is the portal for online services by Nokia.
18:30 - 19:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:00 - 19:30 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:30 - 20:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd

Friday October 22, Room Sachs

Time Room Coordinator Topic Short Description
10:30 - 11:15 Sachs Vincent Untz What is annoying you in GNOME ? If you use GNOME, this BoF is for you! We want to know how you much you like GNOME in general and GNOME in openSUSE, of course, but we also want to know what is annoying you in GNOME. Because we are working hard to ensure that GNOME rocks, and we can only fix the issues we are aware of. This will also be an opportunity to discuss how to fix some issues.
11:15 - 12:00 Sachs Duncan Mac-Vicar ZYpp This BoF objective is to kick off a discussion, get interested people togehter and gather new ideas around ZYpp to create a new and exciting roadmap long abstract
13:30 - 14:15 Sachs Adrian Schröter Automatic Build Description Generation
  • What code generators exist ?
  • How is OBS support working for this ?
  • Discussion about further code generators and how to create them
14:15 - 15:00 Sachs Frank Sundermeyer openSUSE BookBuilder Introduction in the openSUSE BookBuilder
  • automatic output form DocBook sources
  • openSUSE BookBuilder web front-end
  • automated updates and publishing of document from DocBook Sources

long abstract

15:30 - 16:15 Sachs Martin Gräßlin All the things don't know about your Window Manager KWIN - one of the most powerful window managers in the F/OSS world. In this talk the advanced features will be presented. These features are useful to increase the productivity with the Plasma work spaces. The window rule system will be explained and it will be illustrated how broken applications can be taimed with this system

long abstract

16:15 - 17:00 Sachs Lars Dieckow KDE & Perl Survey of the KDE landscape since 2007 and how Perl fits in
17:00 - 17:30 Sachs Siju, inotifyAPI, }ls{ better support for newbies We hang around in #opensuse-de helping newbies. Right now we are testing mumble to integrate voice support for newbies. And we are trying to set up a "UniversalHelp". UniversalHelp could be a distributed DB, which got a clear understanding of the users knowledge presenting effective and useful help in realtime.
17:30 - 18:00 Sachs Lots of people :-) App Store, Community Packages, Universe, Contrib How to provide more apps to users, and to build a great experience around that.
18:00 - 18:30 Sachs Gnokii Discuss General Art Guidelines for the Project We have no general guide how all of our artwork look for the next years. Bento color palette e.g. looks really different to the palette we used before. We need such a guidelines for creating stuff for the ambassadors, so we should it discuss a little bit between marketing and art team
18:30 - 19:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:00 - 19:30 Sachs tbd tbd tbd
19:30 - 20:00 Sachs tbd tbd tbd

Saturday October 23, BoF & Lightning talks, Room Pavilion

Time Coordinator Topic Description
09:00 - 11:00 Klaus Behrla LPI Exams Exams offered :
  • LPIC-1 und LPIC-2 (101, 102, 201, 202) – in German and English
  • LPIC-3 (301, 302, 303, 304) – English only
  • Univention Certified Professional Prüfung (LPI 198) – German only

For further information and registration please visit our LPI page.

11:00 - 12:00 Chani Armitage and Will Stephenson Extending KDE and Plasma in JavaScript This workshop will get you started writing your own desktop components and applets in JavaScript and show you how to distribute them for others to enjoy. Many examples and useful high level recipes make this suitable for the beginning programmer.
13:30 - 15:00 Hendrik Vogelsang Couch Potato Club. Building a multimedia centre based on openSUSE In this workshop we will show you how to convert your openSUSE PC with Freevo into a multimedia machine that can be operated by the tip of your finger. Long abstract
15:30 - 17:00 Pavol Rusnak openSUSE Connect openSUSE Connect - What do you want openSUSE Connect to become? How do you plan to use it?

Longer abstracts for some sessions

The Open-PC case

What is the Open-PC?

-Main Goals: being the "KDE PC" being open. 100% is free software including drivers, software is chosen by the community includes a donation to the KDE project growing a community around the Open-PC using blogs, identi.ca, mailing lists on berlios.de, chatroom on freenode. We chose to be close to openSUSE defaults (good KDE default configuration) and to upstream as well (artwork) Promotes KDE contributions (ie: by helping maintaining KDE repos as an integral part of the Open-PC)

Why openSUSE?

- Great technology: Build Service, SUSE Studio, RPMs easier to build than debs, openSUSE specs clean and neat (important for making your own distribution), YaST, firstboot (very useful for oem images), really good KDE integration

- Great community: very friendly and helpful people (KDE, YaST, KIWI, OBS).

On the bad side: -some features not well documented (ie: firstboot) -I found some bugs, which is inevitable and good to help improve software (this is not really bad) -Some of SUSE technologies not well known Nevertheless, this is changing. ie: growing interest in OBS and kiwi by other companies such as Nokia, Intel, Dell, etc as reflected in the mailing lists. Localization as a tool for improving the situation (regional markets)

Building the Open-PC image: making your own desktop distribution

-Requirements:

* a clear set of goals, target users (teacher, home users, etc)
* software selection (DE, applications) and repository selection (stable vs 

factory)

* languages to be supported (this affects the package selection and firstboot 

as well)

* knowing which format suits you better (live cd, oem image,)
* ideally, an computer with openSUSE so that you build and test it locally
* src.rpms of bootsplash-branding-openSUSE or upstream, gfxboot-branding-

openSUSE/upstream, kdebase4-openSUSE and MozillaFirefox-branding-openSUSE as a starting point. In other words, customising those packages would make you have a custom grub, splashscreen, kdm, ksplash, kickoff, wallpaper, kde defaults and firefox. One thing to take into account: some patterns may wash out your custom artwork later on. One way to make sure your artwork stays is having a "Conflicts" in your spec

* a repository (later on) for serving your packages and updates
* if you're using firstboot, take into account that it shows all supported 

languages by YaST by default. Fortunately, there's a workaround for showing only the language you're going to support (moving YaST language files and move them back once firstboot is done).

* SUSEStudio and OBS accounts

- Highly recommended: staying as a close as possible with your parent distribution. That way the community grows in a healthy way (balanced give- take relationship).

Once you have met those requirements, you can start right after. - Build/test a live cd with your software selection on SUSE Studio is very good for quickly testing and showing your changes to others. - Test you live cd with firstboot (if you're going to use it) - Once your package selection and firstboot look good, export it to kiwi format - Adapt the SUSE Studio exported file to regular kiwi style - Create your packages repository - Customise and upload your packages - Build and test your image locally using kiwi - Build and test your image on OBS (it may require some changes in your kiwi file ie: repository url format) - Once everything looks good, test, test and test it once again. You never know. Perhaps you forgot something or see something that you don't like. Taking decisions is also important. Are we going the right way? Or are be spending too much time on x? Are we choosing the right repos? Do we have to backport a fix? - After testing it, testing once more but this time by applying updates (pay attention to your custom packages... do they disappear?). - At this point you can start distributing your image :-)

Last but not least... - Keeping the image alive. The oBS, having good documentation, clean RPM specs, friendly developers/packages are very important to foster contributions from other people. Also tools like wikis, mailing lists, a freenode chatroom identi.ca, blogs help, especially in building a community which should be integrated with other free software communities in order to have a balanced - and healthy- give and take relationship.

SUSE Studio/Gallery

SUSE Studio (http://susestudio.com) is a free web service that makes it really quick and easy to create and test your very own customized openSUSE distribution, all within the web browser. It outputs a wide variety of formats including Live CD/DVD, Live USB stick, VMWare, VirtualBox, KVM, and Xen.

The recently launched SUSE Gallery (http://susegallery.com) makes it possible to find and share these customized distributions with the community. Users can download, comment, rate, and even clone them for further customization.

This workshop will focus on the advance software and configuration features of SUSE Studio. Attendees should have their own laptops for this session in order to use SUSE Studio (http://susestudio.com) (assuming decent wifi connectivity). Members of the friendly SUSE Studio development team will be present to help answer any queries.

We welcome all Studio users to join this session, to help new users as well as to share ideas, tips, best practices and feedback. It is also great opportunity to meet the rest of the Studio community, or to convince the dev team to implement your favorite feature/bug fix.

Linux for the consumer market

Markets

  • Linux markets and market segmentation
  • positioning of major Linux distros
  • holes and how they are fill or open today
  • new device markets
  • chances for openSUSE

Profiles of consumers using Linux

  • basic profile
  • how they differ
  • what is important
  • information and communication

Consequences for a successful Linux strategy

  • Information availability
  • Interaction and social behaviour
  • creating identity for user
  • force and manage user engagements

OpenICC colour management BoF

Agenda:

  • why and how to do colour management on the desktop
  • basic terminology (ICC, CMM, CMS...)
  • technology excurse (GPU CM, device CM, config sharing)
  • perhaps a small laptop demo
  • ready to answer questions to a upstream maintainer

(all depending on interests and permitted time)

High Availability Setup of openVPN

This talk starts with a short overview of the involved Services (DRBD, Pacermaker, openVPN, ) and shows the detailed dependencies and configuration options of those services to make the openVPN access a high availability service.

Setting up a single openVPN server is mostly not very complex with the available tools. But the integration in an existing business environment with user account data stored in LDAP while at the same time the VPN service becomes very important for developers working at home, can have some rough edges which need to be addressed and solved before the service becomes part of the daily business.

ZYpp

The level of maturity ZYpp reached in the last releases allowed us to slow down development a bit and focus in other distribution areas.

On the other hand, we still get exciting stuff from other contributors: last example is the new download backend to replace aria2 for openSUSE 11.4.

This BoF objective is to kick off a discussion, get interested people together and gather new ideas for the roadmap.

As a starting point for thought: - We see some opportunities. Ark Linux wanted to use ZYpp. MeeGo is using ZYpp, but not yet committed to it. - We would like to improve the communication with MeeGo, Ark and future potential stakeholders in order to create a better community around ZYpp. - Improving the PackageKit integration - Making the stack to run on Fedora is missing only details: Plan to port the stack to Fedora and keep it continuously running there (we have some things already ongoing)

openSUSE BookBuilder

The openSUSE BookBuilder consists of a library to automatically build documents in various output formats e.g. PDF, HTML, epub, and ASCII from DocBook sources. It can also be used to regularly update existing documentation--in this case only documents that have been changed will be rebuilt. The BookBuilder library also supports building only parts of documents such as single chapters. It not only creates the document files, but also a database with detailed information on all documents that have been build and methods to query this database. The library is written in Perl.

The second element of the openSUSE BookBuilder is a Web front-end to either download pre-built books or to build books on demand. The front-end supports user projects where the user can configure his custom set of documents - a customizable virtual book shelf. The Web fontend was written in Perl using Ajax and jQuery.

Although BookBuilder library was primarily developed as a back-end for the Web front-end it can be used stand-alone as well. With the help of the BookBuilder library it is possible to completely automate updating and publishing of documents from DocBook sources. It can be used to make sure websites always have the latest versions of manuals available. In an agile development environment it can provide daily snapshots of the project documentation.

The Web front-end serves as a virtual library for it's users. Imagine a huge project with a large set of manuals written in DocBook. With the Web front-end each user can assemble the exact set of documents that is relevant for him. In doing so, he is not restricted to complete manuals, but can rather add parts of manuals such as single chapters.

KWin - Window Manager

KWin is one of the most powerful window managers in the F/OSS world. It is one of the few window managers to support basically all existing window management paradigms:

  • Stacking
  • Grouping
  • Tiling
  • Compositing

Additionally KWin has some unique features like window specific rules, configurable levels of focus stealing prevention and starting from the next KDE SC release a QtScript interface.

Many features are not known to users. Even after more than two years of KWin development, I still find features, I didn't know about. In this talk the advanced features will be presented. These features are useful to increase the productivity with the Plasma workspaces. The window rule system will be explained and it will be illustrated how broken applications can be taimed with this system. Also some of the not so known, but useful effect functionality will be shown. Questions like the following will be addressed: How to close windows in Alt+Tab or Present Windows? How to speed up window resizing? How to fix your Desktop Effects? Which options should you better not enable to get a useful desktop?

Couch Potato Club. Building a multimedia centre based on openSUSE

The most basic functions of a modern operating system include watching TV & Movies browsing the Internet, listen to Music, looking at Pictures and tasks like that. But users move away from multi task machines under the desk to more specialized devices that fit their life.

In this workshop we will show you how to convert your openSUSE PC with Freevo into a multimedia machine that can be operated by the tip of your finger.

Using Netbeans for Ruby on Rails development

This will be a hacking session which should introduce you to web development using NetBeans IDE.

If you would like actively participate you should:

  • bring your laptop (preferably with openSUSE-11.3 installed), you need Java JRE installed (e.g. java-1_6_0-sun packages)
  • install NetBeans IDE (with Ruby bundle) from http://netbeans.org/downloads/index.html
  • install optional Netbeans plugins (recommended: nbgit for GIT integration, jVi: for VI-like key shortcuts + functionality)
  • install rubygem-rails-2_3 package
  • install other optional rugems which you will need for the Rails application (from devel:languages:ruby:extensions OBS repo), like rubygem-mocha, rubygem-gettext_rails, rubygem-mongrel, rubygem-rcov, rubygem-test-unit, rubygem-rubydebug-*

I'll help you installing all these parts during the workshop, but you can save some time if you install them in advance.

Then we can hack:

  • the NetBeans Rails demo application - too simple, but it should be easy to get it running
  • WebYaST - more complex, but it does something useful ;-) (I suggest installing webyast packages from YaST:Web OBS project to pull in all the requirements and then develop it from a GIT checkout.)
  • of course, you can work on your own Rails app, I'll provide useful hints for you...