Home Wiki > HCL:Raspberry Pi3
Sign up | Login

Revision as of 22:15, 13 January 2017 by Dirkmueller (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

HCL:Raspberry Pi3

tagline: From openSUSE

Raspberry Pi 3

The Raspberry Pi 3 is a credit-card sized computer that plugs into your TV and a keyboard. It’s a capable little PC which can be used for many of the things that your desktop PC does, like spreadsheets, word-processing and games. It also plays high-definition video.

Technical Data

Installing the 64-bit openSUSE Leap image

  1. Download the image you want (Leap is stable, Tumbleweed is rolling) from here:
    Susemini.png
    Version:
    Leap42.2
    JeOS image E20 image XFCE image LXQT image X11 image
    If the direct links above do not work for you (as we are constantly building new images), please check the general download directory for the images.
  2. As root extract the image onto your SD card (replace sdX with the device name of your SD card).
    WARNING: all previous data on the SD card will be lost. Check first if the device you have selected is really your SD card!
     xzcat [image].raw.xz | dd bs=4M of=/dev/sdX iflag=fullblock oflag=direct; sync
  3. Alternatively can download Etcher, an open source tool to flash your image graphically.

  4. Insert the SD card with the openSUSE image into your board.
  5. Connect the board to your PC via serial port (optional, but helpful for debugging; USB-TTL serial cable needed).
  6. Connect the board to your monitor (via DVI/HDMI, optional).
  7. Power on the board.
  8. Walk through the first boot steps.
  9. Ethernet is configured to request an IP via DHCP, check your DHCP server for the board IP if used.
  10. Have a lot of fun...

Default login is root:linux, works on serial console, via ssh, GUI.

Installing the 64-bit openSUSE Tumbleweed image

  1. Download the image you want (Leap is stable, Tumbleweed is rolling) from here:
    Susemini.png
    Version:
    Tumbleweed
    JeOS image E20 image XFCE image LXQT image X11 image
    If the direct links above do not work for you (as we are constantly building new images), please check the general download directory for the images.
  2. As root extract the image onto your SD card (replace sdX with the device name of your SD card).
    WARNING: all previous data on the SD card will be lost. Check first if the device you have selected is really your SD card!
     xzcat [image].raw.xz | dd bs=4M of=/dev/sdX iflag=fullblock oflag=direct; sync
  3. Alternatively can download Etcher, an open source tool to flash your image graphically.

  4. Insert the SD card with the openSUSE image into your Raspberry Pi 3.
  5. Connect the Raspberry Pi 3 to your PC via serial port (optional, but helpful for debugging; USB-TTL serial cable needed).
  6. Connect the Raspberry Pi 3 to your monitor (via DVI/HDMI, optional).
  7. Power on the Raspberry Pi 3.
  8. Ethernet is configured to request an IP via DHCP, check your DHCP server for the Raspberry Pi 3 IP if used.
  9. Have a lot of fun...

Default login is root:linux, works on serial console, via ssh, GUI.


Installing the 64-bit non-upstream openSUSE Tumbleweed image

  1. Download the image you want (Leap is stable, Tumbleweed is rolling) from here:
    Susemini.png
    Version:
    Tumbleweed
    JeOS image E20 image XFCE image LXQT image X11 image
    If the direct links above do not work for you (as we are constantly building new images), please check the general download directory for the images.
  2. As root extract the image onto your SD card (replace sdX with the device name of your SD card).
    WARNING: all previous data on the SD card will be lost. Check first if the device you have selected is really your SD card!
     xzcat [image].raw.xz | dd bs=4M of=/dev/sdX iflag=fullblock oflag=direct; sync
  3. Alternatively can download Etcher, an open source tool to flash your image graphically.

  4. Insert the SD card with the openSUSE image into your Raspberry Pi 3.
  5. Connect the Raspberry Pi 3 to your PC via serial port (optional, but helpful for debugging; USB-TTL serial cable needed).
  6. Connect the Raspberry Pi 3 to your monitor (via DVI/HDMI, optional).
  7. Power on the Raspberry Pi 3.
  8. Ethernet is configured to request an IP via DHCP, check your DHCP server for the Raspberry Pi 3 IP if used.
  9. Have a lot of fun...

Default login is root:linux, works on serial console, via ssh, GUI.


Troubleshooting

I don't see kernel output on serial or HDMI

If you don't see kernel output on serial or HDMI, you can try adding earlycon=uart8250,mmio32,0x3f215040 to the kernel command line.

I see HDMI output in U-Boot, but not in Linux

The upstream Linux graphics driver for the Raspberry Pi has problems with a few monitors. The same applies to the 7" LCD displays. In those cases, please fall back to the efi frame buffer console by passing the following into the kernel command line:

 modprobe.blacklist=vc4

See also